PMR Headline Stories

News and information regarding PMR missions, events & activities.

PMR New Headline Stories

Three Lost Hikers Near Oneonta Gorge, July 12, 2015

On Saturday, July 11, 2015, a party of three hikers set off at 3:00 PM on a challenging hike in the Gorge, using trails that are not maintained. After scrambling up a route known as Elevator Shaft, they lost their way. They were reasonably well prepared with headlamps, extra food, water and clothing however they did not bring a map which might have helped them find a maintained trail. They were able to see the Columbia River below them and they decided to descend. They got into steeper and steeper terrain and, although they had headlamps, they made the wise decision to stay put for the night.

When they were still unable to find their way Saturday morning, they got a call out on their cell phone to a relative who called 911. Using pings from the cell phone, deputies from the Multnomah County Sherriff’s Office were able to obtain an approximate location for the group. A Hood River County Search and Rescue plane was then able to spot them from the air and advise searchers on the best way to reach them. When they heard the plane in the area the hikers scrambled to an open area and waved clothing which allowed the pilot to see them. The pilot dipped his wings side to side signaling that he saw them which raised the hiker’s spirits.

Because the hikers were lost in very steep terrain, the deputies contacted Portland Mountain Rescue (PMR) around 8:00 a.m. As requested, PMR deployed a small team of two rescuers who arrived at base with ropes and other climbing gear. They joined a team of six searchers from Multnomah County Search and Rescue (MCSAR) and headed to a point on Trail 400 below the hiker’s coordinates. From there, they proceeded to bushwhack up through steep terrain and moderate brush. After about an hour of climbing, the PMR rescuers made voice contact with the subjects following a whistle blast.

The trio was in good spirits, which the rescuers attributed to their preparedness (extra food, clothing and water). One of the subjects had an ankle injury, but they determined she could be evacuated down the steep terrain without a litter, which would have been a much longer and more arduous process.

The rescuers proceeded to rig ropes for the descent and outfitted the hikers with helmets and harnesses. They rappelled down the steepest terrain and eventually met the other searchers from MCSAR. Meanwhile, a third PMR rescuer and additional rescuers from MCSAR brought additional ropes and a wheeled litter up Trail 400. The PMR rescuer rigged ropes for the lower part of the descent as hand lines. Once the party reached Trail 400 around 2:30 p.m., they loaded the injured hiker into the litter and wheeled her the rest of the way out. All rescuers were out of the field around 3:15 p.m.

The Multnomah County Sherriff’s Office frequently calls PMR to assist hikers who have become lost in steep areas of the Columbia Gorge. PMR reminds hikers that vertical cliffs and very steep, loose terrain are common throughout the Gorge. Maintained trails allow relatively safe passage through the cliffs, but traveling on old trails or cross country can lead hikers into areas where the route is not clear and the terrain is unsafe. We encourage you to know your route and stay on it, bring a map and compass and know how to use them. If ever you are unsure of your location, retrace your steps to a known point rather than wandering ahead in hopes of a lucky break. And like these hikers, be prepared with extra food, clothing and shelter.

KGW provided good coverage of the mission.

Tanner Creek Rescue, June 28, 2015

Two male hikers in their 40s set out on what they thought was a loop hike up to Munra Point and then down Ruckle Ridge in the Columbia Gorge on June 27, 2015. After completing the tough climb to the top, they attempted to descend on what they thought was the loop trail, but the trail faded and they lost their way, possibly because they had not properly understood the route and the distance between Munra Point and Ruckle Ridege. They were tired and thirsty and decided to descend a steep slope to a creek below, which was Tanner Creek. They made the difficult descent and quenched their thirst, but they were disoriented and fatigued. They were unable to get cell phone reception to call for help. It was a clear evening, so they decided to spend the night where they were and find their way out in the morning.

Sunday morning, they attempted to find a way out, but the creek is at the bottom of a steep canyon, and cliffs and waterfalls prevented them from following the creek out. Mid-morning they were able to get a weak cell phone signal and called for a rescue. Through a return call, the Multnomah County Sherriff’s Office was able to get coordinates for their location and told them to stay put.   The deputies requested an aerial search, and Hood River Search and Rescue put a search plane in the air. Upon hearing the plane, the subjects moved to a location that had clear visibility from the air and waved to the plane. The pilot confirmed their location and provided GPS coordinates for searchers. The deputies first deployed Pacific Northwest Search and Rescue (PNSAR), whose teams searched for the subjects much of the morning, but with the confirmed location of the subjects at the bottom steep slopes, the deputies requested assistance from Portland Mountain Rescue at approximately noon.

PMR fielded its first team of five rescuers who left base around 1:30 p.m. and traveled by car up a limited access fire road to a position above the east side of the creek. From a location directly up slope of the subjects’ reported position, the PMR team descended 1000 feet down steep slopes to the creek. Up reaching the creek, the team split to search both sides of the creek toward the reported location. They quickly located the subjects around 2:15 p.m. resting on a tiny beach above a waterfall.

The subjects were tired and hungry but in good spirits. A medical doctor on the PMR team assessed the two subjects and found no injuries or medical conditions that would require a litter evacuation. After consuming food and water provided by the rescuers, the two subjects felt they could tackle the climb out with guidance and assistance from the rescuers. At this point, two members of PNSAR also reached the subjects and helped. A second team of PMR rescuers was positioned on the fire road with litters, ropes and technical gear, but that equipment was not needed.

The climb out of the canyon was quite steep, but the team safely, belaying themselves by grasping trees and other sturdy vegetation. Due to the subjects’ fatigue, the going was slow, but they made it back to the fire road in about two hours. By 6:00 the subjects and all rescuers were safely back at base.

 

Evacuation from Mt. Hood Summit, June 14, 2015

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Joseph and Casey from Georgia were on an extending climbing tour of the West and along with two friends were excited to climb Mt. Hood. The groupbegan their ascent of the main Southern Route in the wee hours on Sunday, June 14, 2015. After making it to the summit, enjoying the spectacular view and celebrating the climb, they began their descent down One O’Clock Chute at the top of the Coleman Headwall. Disaster struck around 9:30 a.m. when a boulder broke loose above them. Casey was unable to move out of the way, and the boulder struck her leg, breaking it above her boot. Joseph knew she had to be moved from the dangerous chute, so he and other climbers rigged a rope system to raise her back to the summit ridge. They called 911 and requested a rescue.

Around 11:00 a.m. Portland Mountain Rescue was called out and rescuers headed for the mountain. At approximately 2:15 p.m., a team of five PMR rescuers loaded the chair lift and headed up the mountain. A team of medics from AMR headed up before them. One AMR medic reached the patient at approximately 4:300 p.m.; the PMR team reached her about one hour later.

Due to the patient’s location,condition and the hazard posed by extended exposure to rock and icefall on the headwall during a possible lowering operation, it was decided to request a helicopter evacuation. The Army National Guard was mobilizing a crew and aircraft for this possibility. The Black Hawk departed Salem at 5:15 PM and touched down at Timberline at 5:46 PM for an operational briefing. By 6:30 the helicopter was on its way to the summit. Upon arrival, it lowered a Medic and a litter.     The patient was packaged and hoisted into the helicopter around 7:00 p.m. and then flown to a Portland hospital. PMR rescuers assisted Joseph and a good Samaritan climber down the mountain. All rescuers were out of the field around 9:00 p.m.

This mission is a reminder that the walls of the upper crater are unstable and that conditions can be very dangerous this time of the year, particularly in the morning as the sun warms the ice and rock. This mission also illustrates how long it can take for rescuers to reach a subject high on the mountain, even in good conditions and that helicopter evacuation may not be an option or may be delayed.

KATU, KGW and the Oregonian provided good coverage of the rescue.

 

Climber Falls from Coleman Headwall, June 4, 2015

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Many climbers headed up the south side of Mt. Hood on June 4, 2015 to take advantage of good climbing conditions in the early morning. Unfortunately, one climber, a 66 year-old man, fell from high on the Coleman Headwall and came to rest at the top of Hot Rocks on the west side of the Hogsback. Members of his party, including his 17 year-old grandson, descended to his location quickly and found him not breathing. They started CPR, but to no avail.

The Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office contacted PMR at 10:05 a.m. and requested help in evacuating the body. At the same time a group of eight medics from the AMR Reach and Treat Team were conducting a training lower on the mountain. They reached the scene quickly and assessed the situation. One of the AMR medics, who is also PMR rescuer, escorted the rest of the victim’s climbing party down the mountain.

Due to delays associated with construction on Highway 26, PMR rescuers did not arrive at Timberline Lodge until around 1:00 p.m. They packed a litter, ropes and other evacuation gear up the mountain and reached the scene around 3:45 p.m.

Using PMR’s standard low angle rope system, the PMR rescuers and AMR medics lowered the subject down the steepest terrain and then slid him down to the top of the Palmer lift. From there a snow cat carried them to the Timberline Lodge area, where they transferred the subject to the medical examiner.

At this time, PMR does not know whether the subject died from a medical condition and then fell or whether he died from trauma sustained in the fall. Body recoveries are emotionally difficult missions, and we are saddened by this duty. PMR sends its sincere condolences to the climber’s family and friends.

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